Welcome

Hello and welcome to our website! We are from Sydney, Australia, and after years of planning and saving, in February 2014 we packed up and sold up to travel around the world on motorbikes with our dogs. We bought two BMW 650 GSโ€™s in Texas, kitted up then headed south for the adventure of a life time. We've been going for 7 years now and have travelled all across North and South America, circumnavigated the African continent and explored parts of Europe. Coming up next we'll be crossing Asia and completing our adventure with a tour of all 7 states and territories of Australia. Well, thats the plan anyway!

We are tracking our story with regular blogs and videos as well as almost daily posts to Instagram, Facebook, Youtube and Twitter. So please have a look around our site, leave comments, contact us with any questions and we hope you enjoy.

Meet the team

๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ Stu ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ

Stu started life in London with his parents, two older sisters and younger brother but moved to Australia when he was five years old. He had a fairly normal childhood but he was never going to a normal adult. He left school at 16 and started a promising career in IT. But his thirst for travel grew so he joined the Royal Australian Navy. The deployments he undertook were a taste of what was out there and only fanned the flames of adventure. Stu made this round the world journey possible, his systematic approach to research, planning and implementation turns any challenge or obstacle into manageable tasks. Stu is extraordinary and unprejudiced.

๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ Janell ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ

Janell had a remarkable childhood growing up in Sydney with her Mum, Grandparents and older Sister. School and work was in Sydney with their dog, cat and birds. But come weekend or school holidays, everyone, including the dog, cat and birds, piled into the family car and drove to the farm in Jerryโ€™s Plains where 4 horses eagerly awaited their arrival or up the coast to Yamba, the family beachside holiday house. Janells career took her into project management roles after studying civil engineering. She believes travel is the best way to learn how people around the world living in different cultures, climates and landscapes find solutions to civil problems. Janell is passionate and grounded.

๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ Skyla ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ

The original and the best. Skyla was our first love, we adopted her in Canberra, Australia, from the pound. She was a Staffy Cross, about 6 months old, and we had 7 crazy, beautiful years with her. She was a very anxious dog which we did our best to manage, the Pillion Pooch was designed to keep her comfortable and safe in the big wide world and she loved to ride. Skyla passed away in Venezuela after a noble fight with cancer. Skyla was brave and beautiful.

๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ด Shadow ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ด

She may be small but sheโ€™s ready to take on the World and she has a heart of Gold. Whatever her early years, she was destined to join our pack. She ran on to the road in rural Colombia as Stu was riding and was run over by the following car. She lost an eye but gained a pack that day. In no time at all she was on a plane to Florida, touring the USA, then aboard the QM2 sailing to England. She will always be 9 countries behind Weeti. Shadow is courageous and kind.

๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ช Weeti ๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ช

Weeti is our quirky Venezuelan street dog from El Callao. She had a tough start to life being hit by a truck and further bullied by bad people. Her rescuers, Luis and Alicia, however were wonderful and never gave up on her recovery, they are the reason she walks today. Weeti was about 2 years old when she joined our pack, a month after Skyla passed. It wasnโ€™t planned, it just happened and she rose to the challenge. Weeti is loyal and strong.

100,000 sMiles

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Time spent travelling

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Egypt

Egypt

by Stu and Janell Clarke

Egypt was our 25th and final country in Africa. We arrived at the Wadi Halfa border to cross from Sudan into Egypt on the 14th November. We arrived with supplies because this time we knew for sure that we could be camping at the border. We had travelled Africa without a Carnet de Passage (basically a passport for your vehicle) and for many countries we either passed through without any documentation required for the motorbikes or we completed a Temporary Import Permit (TIP) at the border. Taking the path of the TIP is a bit more effort and at times risky in Africa but it saved us a lot of money. Stu's research online indicated we would most definitely need to purchase an Egyptian Carnet at the Wadi Halfa border and we had all the contact details and costs to organise it. Our supplies were basic and for a few days in case we couldn't get access to shops. But what we had read online quite consistently said people could leave their vehicles at the border post and take public transport ...

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Sudan

Sudan

by Stu and Janell Clarke

It was by no means a secret to anyone that the thought of entering Sudan both excited Stu and made Janell quite uneasy. And even she would be the first to admit that there was no reasonable explanation for this feeling, other than a link to the war torn country of South Sudan. Stu had deployed for 6 months to South Sudan on a peacekeeping mission during his service in the Royal Australian Navy. As is so often the case on this adventure we were both surprised and delighted by what we saw and who we met. We left Sudan with a genuine fondness for the desert country and a hope to one day return. The border crossing from Ethiopia didn't quite go as planned and resulted in a 2 night camp at the border. We were travelling without a Carnet for the motorbikes but had been advised that we could get an 'in/out' (transit) permit at the Sudan border which would allow us to cross Sudan in 48 hours. You can imagine that 48 hours to cross a country is not ideal, you see very little other than the t...

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Violent Riots in Ethiopia

Violent Riots in Ethiopia

by Stu and Janell Clarke

Ethiopia proved to be unique amongst african nations from the get go. At the border crossing we were invited to have tea with the officials while they worked out how to import our bikes without us having a Carnet. The process was easy in the end, they just completed a customs declaration form, which included all our electronics (phones, laptops etc.) and added the bikes to this. There was no fee, we just had to show the items on the way out in order to get our passport exit stamp. Ethiopians are a proud people, most people would bring up the fact that Ethiopia had not been conquered by a European nation at the start of any conversation. We thought the people smiled naturally instead of having a downcast look that so many African's and other ex-colonials have from the poverty and gross class division forced on them. Ethiopian culture was warm and inviting and their food was an absolute delight. As part of their very unique take on Christianity, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church has over ...

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Uganda and Kenya

Uganda and Kenya

by Stu and Janell Clarke

Uganda was the only country in Africa that we had both travelled to before The Pack Track. In February 2013 we spent a few days in Kampala, squeezing in a one day safari, before heading off on a cruise of the Canary Islands. Riding our motorbikes across the border and onto Ugandan territory felt poles apart from this past memory. How easy it is to fly in and out of a place, stay in a resort and then boast of having been there. If any country put our overland travels into perspective, to appreciate just how far away from Australia we were, it was Uganda. We crossed into Uganda at Kyanika. We had to obtain an Exit Confirmation certificate for the motorbikes in Rwanda and then pass through the Police checkpoint where they registered the bikes leaving the country. Uganda had a one-stop border post which is always a sight for sore eyes, everything in one building is so much easier and quicker for us. At the Customs Office we imported the vehicles where we needed to pay 73,000 Uganda Shil...

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